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Color Little Dolly

COLOR LITTLE DOLLY


Color Lil Dolly is a synopsis of factual massacres that occurred in Ocoee, Florida in 1920 and three years later in Rosewood Florida, bringing to light a story in the life of Orange Grove Citrus Pickers. It is a story aligned with events that would later rise to the critical movement forty-five years later during the era of Martin Luther King.
A Negro family finding a white child left on the road to the migrant camp assist and cares for the child until the authorities seek the child’s mother. Unfortunately, she is not found and there is no law in place as to who shall take care of the child. The Negro family is subjected to the horrid display of several people who are influential members of the Orange Grove. There are several hearings that seek the remedy, however after judicated they fail to bring to rest the problem. Until????



Peter J. Kajano

pjkajano@hotmail.com


518-369-0092











EXT. MORNING APRIL 01, 1963 WINTER PARK, FLORIDA AMTRAK STATION

Exiting train, a young white woman releases her Samsonite suitcase on the platform as an older tall slender Negro man embraces her and picks up the suite case. Taking hold of his arm she smiles raising her eyebrows.

DARLENE
Samuel, I haven’t had a moments rest wondering what’s so important that you decided to meet me here.

SAMUEL
Miss Dolly you told me you were contemplating visiting me in Jacksonville this week. I just re-routed you. And you know old Samuel must have a good reason for you being here.

DARLENE
(Tugging on his arm)
Samuel you’re acting like an Attorney. I’m not letting you off that easy. I want to know why I’m here.

SAMUEL
You’ve always wanted to know everything like an im-pa-ti-ent child. (Laughing again) And you’re still tugging on my arm. Are you ready for lunch?

DARLENE
No not just yet. How about sitting here in the park? It’s such a nice day.

Removing a pack of Lucky Strikes from his top pocket.

DARLENE
Thank you. Reaching for a cigarette

SAMUEL
I forgot you are a modern lady. But
after our smoke, I think we need to get
you to the hotel.


DARLENE
I have plenty of time Samuel. Now just tell me what this is all about?

SAMUEL
All right, I planned on spending this evening talking about it, and since… it’s only eleven forty-five and you’re not going to give me any rest, I best begin.

Looking up to the sky Samuel places his hands together in prayer. He cups them together and looks directly into her eyes.

SAMUEL CONT’D
After your Mama died last year, I got to thinking about all the questions you asked me over the years. In fact, I wrote them all down. Miss Dolly, your Mama made me promise not to provide any information about your past. And it’s been eating at me for years.

DARLENE
Why? Was my Mama frightened?

SAMUEL
No, I think she thought she was protecting you.

DARLENE
What did she do?

SAMUEL
Nothing, but what I tell you today has little to do with your Mama. It has everything to do with you and why you’re here today.

DARLENE
Samuel, you make it sound intriguing.

SAMUEL
Yes, I’m certain you will find it intriguing, and much more. I’m just proud to have had a part in it.

SAMUEL (CONT’D)
I guess the best place to start is thirteen years before you were born… just a few miles from here.

FADE

FADE IN

EXT. FLASHBACK NOVEMBER 2nd 1920 OCOEE, FLORIDA

Sputtering’s of motorized engines and pounding hooves grow louder, as they enter the road leading to the Black community,